Les différentes interactions entre l’homme et l’eau autour du monde

Pénurie d’eau ou gaspillage, quels sont les différents rapports à l’eau que les hommes entretiennent à travers le monde ? Ce photographe a voyagé pour ramener une ébauche de réponse…

A l’occasion de l’exposition Histoires d’eau: La crise mondiale de l’eau en images, Photoville, Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York du 21 sept à 12 oct 2016, Mustafah Abdulaziz a parcouru neuf pays pour capturer les différents rapports qu’entretiennent les hommes avec l’eau.

Brésil, Chine, Inde, Pakistan ou encore Nigeria, ces pays dénoncent une réelle inégalité par rapport aux pays les plus riches.

Histoires d’eau :

Claudio, Paraguay River, Cáceres, Mato Grosso, Brésil 2015:

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Barrage des Trois Gorges, Yichang, province du Hubei, Chine 2015:

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Le lit de la rivière Ganges, près du barrage, Kanpur, Inde, 2014:

The riverbed drained from the barrage, leaving behind a desert-like area where the water used to be. Citizens of the area complain of the poor health of the river; the depletion of the water levels, the pollution, and the disappearance of river life.  Mustafah Abdulaziz is an American documentary photographer based in Berlin. His on-going project ‘Water’ has received support from the United Nations and VSCO. In 2012, he was named one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, and is the winner of the Syngenta photography award, 2015. Mustafah is working with WWF, WaterAid and Earthwatch to document images and stories highlighting the global water crisis. These powerful images form the Water Stories photographic exhibition supported by the HSBC Water Programme. The exhibition will open in New York to coincide with Photoville, 21 September 2016, and will be on public display by the East River in DUMBO throughout October. The exhibition adds previously unexhibited images from Mustafah's shoot in New York this summer. Water Stories first launched in Stockholm to coincide with the 25th anniversary of World Water Week and Stockholms Kulturfestival in August 2015, and was also shown in London to mark UN World Water Day, in March 2016.  INDIA With a population of 1.25 billion, India is the world’s largest democracy and one of the fastest-growing large economies, second only to China. Inequalities persist, however, with more than 300 million people living in extreme poverty. Essential social services continue to be inadequate, from safe drinking water and waste disposal, to education and healthcare.  India has met the United Nations’ 2015 Millennium Development Goal to halve the proportion of people without access to safe water. Yet nearly 76 million people still lack a safe water supply and more than half of the population does not have access to a toilet. Open defecation has serious consequences; it causes diseases such as diarrhoea, which, without good health systems, can be fatal. Almost half of children under five are stunted – a result of chronic malnutrition due to repeated diarrhoea during the most critical period of growth and development in early life. The Clean India Mission, one of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s flagship programmes, has made sanitation a national priority, with the ambitious target of building a toilet in every household by 2019. With a countrywide focus on behavioral change, as well as infrastructure, the Government can save lives, bring dignity to millions and add to India’s growing reputation as a modern, innovative nation. The industrial city of Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, exemplifies many of India’s challenges. Here, 1.8 million people – half the city’s population – don’t have access to a toilet. Of these, 1.1 million people live in slums. The population has grown rapidly over the past ten years, driven by economic opportunity. Combined with mismanagement of water resources, a falling water table and poor investment in public services, existing infrastructure cannot cope.

Déforestation, Tangará da Serra, l’Etat du Mato Grosso, Brésil 2015:

Agriculture is expanding rapidly in Brazil. In the state of Mato Grosso, home to the Pantanal wetland and its headwaters, vast areas of forests have been cleared and vital vegetation has been removed around water sources to make way for cattle farming and staple crops for export such as soy and sugar cane. Lack of enforced forest protection and unsustainable farming practices lead to extensive soil erosion. Without the defence the trees provide, silt and agricultural pesticides pollute the rivers, reducing the water quality and, in extreme cases, stopping the flow of the natural springs altogether.  Mustafah Abdulaziz is an American documentary photographer based in Berlin. His on-going project ‘Water’ has received support from the United Nations and VSCO. In 2012, he was named one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, and is the winner of the Syngenta photography award, 2015. Mustafah is working with WWF, WaterAid and Earthwatch to document images and stories highlighting the global water crisis. These powerful images form the Water Stories photographic exhibition supported by the HSBC Water Programme. The exhibition will open in New York to coincide with Photoville, 21 September 2016, and will be on public display by the East River in DUMBO throughout October. The exhibition adds previously unexhibited images from Mustafah's shoot in New York this summer. Water Stories first launched in Stockholm to coincide with the 25th anniversary of World Water Week and Stockholms Kulturfestival in August 2015, and was also shown in London to mark UN World Water Day, in March 2016.  BRAZIL Latin America’s largest country, Brazil holds 12% of the world’s fresh water. It is home to the world’s biggest river, the mighty Amazon, and the world’s largest wetland, the Pantanal. Both are threatened by deforestation, expanding agriculture and infrastructure.  It is a country so rich with water resources and yet over the last three years its most highly populated cities have grappled with the worst drought since records began. The problem is worsened by overpopulation, poor water resource management and bad planning, resulting in taps running dry and enforced water rations.  São Paulo is the largest economy in Latin America, and it faces increasing water pollution problems. The severely polluted Tietê River runs through the metropolitan area and is home to 20 million inhabitants. Insufficient water and development management sees increased levels of unregulated sewageand rubbish discharged into the river. Hundreds of residents of the city are being trained as citizen scientists to monitor freshwater quality and become ambassadors for improving attitudes towards water. Hundreds of miles away in the Pantanal wetland in Mato Grosso State, where water is seemingly in abundance, work is ongoing to protect the rivers and springs that feed it. The Pantanal is equivalent in size to Belgium, Switzerland, Portugal and Holland combined, and is home to around 5000 species of plants and animals and communities that rely on its annual flooding cycle. Its headwaters are under threat from deforestation and expanding agriculture and infrastructure, all of which lead to pollution and erosion in the rivers that eventually flow down to the Pantanal.  Here, work continues to secure commitment from all sectors of society – governments, businesses and local communities – to take collective action to protect and restore the natural environment and securing enough water for them, and the Pantanal, now and for future generations.

Crevettes shing, Lac Hong, province du Hubei, Chine 2015 :

Although poems and stories about Lake Hong’s purity are enshrined in Chinese cultural history, it has been damaged by unsustainable fishing practices. Over the past 14 years, WWF, its partners, local communities and government have helped to restore the lake, demonstrating how sustainable fishing methods can result in healthy fish, reduced pollution and clean water. © Mustafah Abdulaziz/ WWF-UK Mustafah Abdulaziz is an American documentary photographer based in Berlin. His on-going project ‘Water’ has received support from the United Nations and VSCO. In 2012, he was named one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, and is the winner of the Syngenta photography award, 2015. Mustafah is working with WWF, WaterAid and Earthwatch to document images and stories highlighting the global water crisis. These powerful images form the Water Stories photographic exhibition supported by the HSBC Water Programme. The exhibition will open in New York to coincide with Photoville, 21 September 2016, and will be on public display by the East River in DUMBO throughout October. The exhibition adds previously unexhibited images from Mustafah's shoot in New York this summer. Water Stories first launched in Stockholm to coincide with the 25th anniversary of World Water Week and Stockholms Kulturfestival in August 2015, and was also shown in London to mark UN World Water Day, in March 2016.  CHINA China is predicted to become the world’s largest economy, and the pressure that its rapidly expanding industry puts on the natural environment is expected to grow, too. As China develops, and as its overseas investments lead to increasing impacts in other countries, its choices will be pivotal for the future of our planet. It is possible that development in this vast country could result in China becoming a global leader in renewable energy and clean technology. The situation across the vast Yangtze River basin is a prime example of China at a crossroads. The 1.8 million square kilometre basin supports a third of China’s 1.3 billion people and half of the country’s species of wild animals, fish and plants. In recent decades increases in shipping, pollution, illegal fishing and infrastructure construction have impacted on the freshwater supply and the communities and wildlife that depend on it.  Work is ongoing to safeguard this precious river and balance the needs of a growing economy and population with those of the environment. At local, national and basin levels, authorities are being helped to design and implement policies that ensure water is allocated sustainably, fairly and productively. Local and multinational companies are being empowered to reduce pollution throughout the supply chain. As a result, they are seeing that by operating sustainably they can boost their profits and reduce risks to their businesses. Better fishing and farming techniques are improving food security and livelihoods.  Communities throughout the region are being supported to secure water sources; they’re being educated about how to protect the environment and ensure a thriving Yangtze for generations to come.

Vue aérienne de Lower Manhattan, New York, 2016:

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Bewatoo, Tharparkar, Pakistan, 2013:

Women pull water from a well in the Thar desert, where temperatures hover at 48-50°C on summer days. With an extremely low water table and continuing drought, sometimes water must be hauled from a depth of 150-200 feet. “Women fall unconscious on their way to these dug wells,” says Marvi Bheel, 45, a resident of Bewatoo, Tharparkar. The journey can take up to three hours. From the water-scarce regions in southern Ethiopia to the desert wells of Pakistan, it is women who are primarily responsible for gathering water.  Credit: WaterAid/ Mustafah Abdulaziz Mustafah Abdulaziz is an American documentary photographer based in Berlin. His on-going project ‘Water’ has received support from the United Nations and VSCO. In 2012, he was named one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, and is the winner of the Syngenta photography award, 2015. Mustafah is working with WWF, WaterAid and Earthwatch to document images and stories highlighting the global water crisis. These powerful images form the Water Stories photographic exhibition supported by the HSBC Water Programme. The exhibition will open in New York to coincide with Photoville, 21 September 2016, and will be on public display by the East River in DUMBO throughout October. The exhibition adds previously unexhibited images from Mustafah's shoot in New York this summer. Water Stories first launched in Stockholm to coincide with the 25th anniversary of World Water Week and Stockholms Kulturfestival in August 2015, and was also shown in London to mark UN World Water Day, in March 2016.  PAKISTAN Pakistan is one of the most populous countries in the world, and urbanization and political instability have resulted in millions of people lacking access to safe water and sanitation. While progress has been made, 16 million people still do not have access to safe water and 68 million people do not have access to a toilet – more than half of the country’s population. Desert areas make up a substantial portion of the country’s geography, especially in the central and southeastern regions. In the Thar Desert, Sindh province, families lead a semi-nomadic lifestyle, migrating every three years in search of water. Women spend on average four to six hours a day trekking in the blistering heat to reach unprotected wells. Groundwater is contaminated by saline and fluoride from natural sources, affecting a large population; residents experience hypertension and fluorosis, a condition which causes skeletal damage and bone deformities. In coastal areas, availability of water dictates the rhythm of daily life, with floods occurring in the rainy season and droughts in the dry season. In recent years, the district of Thatta has experienced six major natural disasters including the severe floods of 2010-11, which inflicted widespread damage and halved the country’s potential economic growth.

Un tuyau d’égout sous Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx, New York, 2016:

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La pompe à eau dans Osukputu, Benue, Nigeria 2015 :

Women and children gather at the hand pump. The water point serves the entire community of around 800 people with clean, safe water.  For Osukputu, the arrival of clean, safe water means better health, stronger livelihoods and happier families. Mustafah Abdulaziz is an American documentary photographer based in Berlin. His on-going project ‘Water’ has received support from the United Nations and VSCO. In 2012, he was named one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, and is the winner of the Syngenta photography award, 2015. Mustafah is working with WWF, WaterAid and Earthwatch to document images and stories highlighting the global water crisis. These powerful images form the Water Stories photographic exhibition supported by the HSBC Water Programme. The exhibition will open in New York to coincide with Photoville, 21 September 2016, and will be on public display by the East River in DUMBO throughout October. The exhibition adds previously unexhibited images from Mustafah's shoot in New York this summer. Water Stories first launched in Stockholm to coincide with the 25th anniversary of World Water Week and Stockholms Kulturfestival in August 2015, and was also shown in London to mark UN World Water Day, in March 2016.

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